Supertramp: an appreciation


Here I am with a third reflection on Rock Music, mostly bands founded in the 1970s. There is a thread that runs through the independent individuals behind these accounts I write, something that goes a bit beyond words provided by a DJ announcing a song on the radio.

Founder Roger Hodgson



How can it happen that an important rock group, Supertramp, has not yet been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? I don’t expect the Archies to get there first, but I do not understand how music with such a unique character in sound can be so quickly forgotten. The last attempt to get the ‘tramp nominated was in 2017, so I am honoring them by dedicating a blog to their incomparable songs and hoping that it makes an impression on a reader or three. Perhaps someone at the Hall of Fame reads this blog and gets the gears moving up there in Cleveland, OH.

Breakfast in America icon

The genius behind Supertramp may be traced to two founding members: Roger Hodgson and Rick Davies. Speaking of the name Davies, the band’s name comes from a 1910 novel that you can access on the internet: The Autobiography of a Supertramp. Noted here in case your interest has been piqued by the mention of this 110-year-old piece of fiction.

Hodgson wrote and composed most of the songs, he gave the group its defining character, in my humble opinion. Davies provided a personal touch of his own, but these two musicians drifted apart to different geographies and to personal predilections. Roger Hodgson continues to appear at concerts; fortunately, these are readily available on YouTube. There haven’t been many days that go by without my revisiting some of their performances. Hodgson is the singer and composer playing the piano on stage. A few musical instruments used in each performance gives the production a unique sound that has become a trademark to the ear, an instant connection.

Band member John Helliwell worked the instruments to arrive at the distinctive sounds in such works as the Logical Song. and Take the Long Way Home using the harmonica (2:01 in) and a saxophone (4:07 in).

Hoping you enjoyed this little background piece from a big fan of their work.

And, thanks for reading.

4 thoughts on “Supertramp: an appreciation”

    1. Thanks for the support, Henry. Supertramp would seem to qualify for induction into the Hall of Fame for any number of solid reasons. They fit the time limit considerations and have an enthusiastic audience and fan base out there. I am going to personally investigate the situation to determine just what is holding the process up. I shall also learn something about present-day advocating in the process in place. My wife and I have recently watched a celebration in a past induction service, that one was for Donovan, another excellent talent who made it in.
      Wish me luck!

      Liked by 2 people

Comments drive content, so please comment.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: